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Death Finds a Way: A Janie Riley Mystery by Lorine McGinnis Schulze

Janie Riley is an avid genealogist with a habit of stumbling on to dead bodies. She and her husband head to Salt Lake City Utah to research Janie's elusive 4th great-grandmother. But her search into the past leads her to a dark secret. Can she solve the mysteries of the past and the present before disaster strikes? Available now on Amazon.com and the CreateSpace eStore
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Death Finds a Way: A Janie Riley Mystery
by Lorine McGinnis Schulze

Janie Riley is an avid genealogist with a habit of stumbling on to dead bodies. She and her husband head to Salt Lake City Utah to research Janie's elusive 4th great-grandmother. But her search into the past leads her to a dark secret. Can she solve the mysteries of the past and the present before disaster strikes? Available now on Amazon.com and Amazon.ca

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French Indian Wars History & Genealogy

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Battles of the 42nd, 77th and 78th Highland Regiments with Lists of the "Killed and Wounded"

Thanks goes to Deborah for this series of articles, which she generously donated to The Canadian Military Heritage Project and which is used here with consent.

After years of warlike activity with France, England officially declared war on May 18, 1756, beginning the Seven Year's War in Europe. But the focus of the war soon shifted away from the continent to the colonies. Echoeing the conflicts in Europe, the final struggle for the empire was to take place in North America and in the West Indies. British regulars and American militia joined forces against France and her Indian allies in a campaign commonly known as the French and Indian Wars. After suffering numerous defeats and disappointments, England and her colonies successfully reversed the course of events and conquered the Canadian and regular armies of France. Peace between Britain and France was proclaimed with the signing of the Treaty of Paris on February 10, 1763; however, warfare against the Indians endured for sometime after.

The following accounts of the French-Indian Wars focus mainly on the involvement of the Highland Regiments in the battles and expeditions listed below. However, a list of other regiments involved, and the field officers in general command during these battles, have been noted in order to facilitate further research.

Fort DuQuesne Expedition, July-November, 1758

Source: "Sketches of the Character, Manners and Present State of the Highlanders of Scotland; with details of The Military Service of The Highland Regiments", by Major-General David Stewart, Vol I & II, (1825), Edinburgh.

  • Highland Regiment: Montgomery's Highlanders (77th)
  • Other Regiments: the Royal Americans, and the Provincials
  • Battle Under General Command of: Brigadier-General Forbes

Abridged text: The prodigious extent of country which they had to traverse, through woods without roads, and over mountains and morasses almost impassable, rendered this expedition no less difficult than the other two, although the point of attack was less formidable, and the number of the enemy inferior.

In July the Brigadier marched from Philadelphia; and, after surmounting many difficulties, in the month of September reached Raystown, ninety miles from DuQuesne. Thence General Forbes sent forward Colonel Bouquet with 2000 men, to Loyal Henning, fifty miles in advance, whence this officer dispatched Major James Grant of Montgomery's, with 400 Highlanders and 500 Provincials, to reconnoitre Fort DuQuesne, distant about forty miles.

If Colonel Bouquet endangered this detachment by sending forward a small force so far beyond the possibility of support from the main body, the conduct of Major Grant did not lessen the risk. When near the garrison, he advanced with pipes playing and drums beating, as if he had been going to enter a friendly town. The enemy did not wait to be attacked. Alarmed at the noise in advance, they marched out to meet the assailants, when a desperate conflict ensued. Major Grant ordered his men to throw off their coats, and advance sword in hand. The enemy fled on the first charge, and rushed into the woods, where they spread themselves; but being afterwards joined by a body of Indians, they rallied, and surrounded the detachment on all sides. Being themselves concealed by a thick foliage, their heavy and destructive fire could not be returned with any effect. Major Grant was taken in an attempt to force into the wood, where he observed the thickest of the fire. On losing their commander, and seeing so many officers killed and wounded, the troops dispersed. (September 14th) About 150 of the Highlanders got back to Loyal Henning. (Fort Ligonier?)

Major Grant was taken prisoner, and 231 soldiers of his regiment were killed and wounded. This check, however, did not dispirit General Forbes, who pushed forward with expedition.

Aftermath: Many of Grant's men who were captured in September were held prisoner at the Fort during the remaining months of battle. By late November, Forbes' officers wanted to pull back their troops and winter at Fort Ligonier, but the General ordered the men forward.

Rather than endure a siege and capture, the French destroyed their post; but before retreating from the Fort, many of the prisoners were ruthlessly slaughtered: "On the night of November 24th the men heard a tremendous explosion. Next day they came in sight of the smoking ruins of Fort DuQuesne, blown up and burned. No enemy was in sight - only a row of grisly stakes erected by the Indians. On each one was the head of one of Grant's detachment and a Scotch kilt tied around its base." ("The Colonial Wars 1689-1762" by Howard H. Peckham, (1964); Chicago, p. 178). NB: The fort was renamed Fort Pitt. Major Grant was later exchanged.


77th Highland Officers Killed (plus 3 sergeants, 2 drummers & pipers, and 92 soldiers):
  • Captains: George Munro; and William Macdonald.
  • Lieutenants: Alexander Mckenzie; Colin Campbell; William McKenzie; Alexander Macdonald; and Roderick McKenzie.
77th Highland Officers Wounded (plus 7 sergeants, 3 drummers & pipers, 201 soldiers):
  • Captain: Hugh McKenzie
  • Lieutenants: Alexander McDonald, jr.; Archibald Robertson; and Henry Monro.
  • Ensigns: John McDonald; and Alexander Grant.

Disclaimer: Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on The Olive Tree Genealogy pages, all transcriptions are subject to human error, and researchers should always check the original source of any list.


 
 

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