OliveTreeGenealogy.com logo for Olive Tree Genealogy and its free free genealogical resourcesYour link to the past since February 1996! Search for your ancestors in free Ships' Passenger lists, Naturalization Records, Palatine Genealogy, Canadian Genealogy, American Genealogy, Native American Genealogy, Huguenots, Mennonites, Almshouse Records, Orphan Records, church records, military muster rolls, census records, land records and more. Olive Tree Genealogy Free Genealogy Database marks FREE genealogy records.
Olive Tree Genealogy website chosen by Family Tree Magazine as one of 101 Best Genealogy Websites 2017 Olive Tree Genealogy website chosen by Family Tree Magazine for 2017

Check out the Genealogy Books written by Olive Tree Genealogy!

FIRST NAME


LAST NAME


LOCALITY


Follow Olive Tree Genealogy on             

Death Finds a Way: A Janie Riley Mystery by Lorine McGinnis Schulze

Janie Riley is an avid genealogist with a habit of stumbling on to dead bodies. She and her husband head to Salt Lake City Utah to research Janie's elusive 4th great-grandmother. But her search into the past leads her to a dark secret. Can she solve the mysteries of the past and the present before disaster strikes? Available now on Amazon.com and the CreateSpace eStore
Organize Your Genealogy in Evernote in 10 Easy Steps is a must have!
 


Try an Ancestry.com Free Trial


Genealogy Mystery Book!


Death Finds a Way: A Janie Riley Mystery
by Lorine McGinnis Schulze

Janie Riley is an avid genealogist with a habit of stumbling on to dead bodies. She and her husband head to Salt Lake City Utah to research Janie's elusive 4th great-grandmother. But her search into the past leads her to a dark secret. Can she solve the mysteries of the past and the present before disaster strikes? Available now on Amazon.com and Amazon.ca

Genealogy Newsletter

Subscribe to Olive Tree Genealogy Newsletter

Powered by MailChimp

JOIN the Free Olive Tree Genealogy Newsletter. Be the first to know of genealogy events. Find out when new genealogy databases are put online. Get tips for finding your elusive brick-wall ancestor

Share With Others

Share with other genealogists! Tweet this page!

Follow OliveTreeGenealogy

Google Plus Proilfe page for Olive Tree GenealogyFollow Olive Tree Genealogy on Google+

Search OliveTreeGenealogy



Google Custom Search
Search Olive Tree Genealogy Family of Websites

Search Fold3

Search Military Records - Fold3

Mohawk Clothing & Dress

Native American Overview
Native American Mailing Lists
Native American Links
Mohawk Family Names
Mohawk Government
Mohawk Food
Mohawk Clothing
Mohawk Shelter
Mohawk Cycles of Activity
Mohawk Warfare
Mohawk Ceremonies
Mohawk Dreams
Mohawk False Faces
Mohawk Resources & Addresses
Native American Books

My ninth great-grandmother, Ots-Toch or Alstock, who was born circa 1620 in the Mohawk village of Canajoharie, New York, was the reason for my delving into the culture and traditions of the Mohawk nation. Ots-Toch married a Dutch settler, Cornelis Van Slyke, but never left the Mohawk village. I became intrigued with her story and wanted to know more about her heritage and mine. Brian Brown generously shared his own research, much of which you can read on these pages.

Clothing

This is one aspect of Iroquoian culture that underwent considerable change in the late 1600s and early 1700s, with the availability of beads, trade cloth etc. from European sources. My focus will be on clothing styles as described by early European (mainly French) visitors in the early 1600s.

In summertime, children of both sexes who were less than 12-13 years old went naked. Older boys and men wore a loincloth. Women and older girls wore nothing above the waist, and a wrap around knee-length skirt which extended to the knees. Around the village, everyone went barefoot in warm weather. Since deer skin moccasin soles wear out through heavy use, they saved them by not wearing them when not needed. Away from the village, moccasins would be worn. Also, a man or a boy would sometimes wear leggings when away from the village. These were two tubes of deerskin that covered the legs from the ankle to the hip. Leggings were used as protection from thorns, poison ivy, etc. The leggings were tied by cords to the waistbelt. Women and girls also wore leggings, but since their skirts protected the upper legs, their leggings just extended to the knee and tied above the knee.

Kilts, which look a lot like skirts, were occasionally worn by Iroquoian men on formal, dress-up occasions, but seem not to have been part of the day-to-day wear. Nudity among adults in warm weather was apparently not uncommon in the 17th Century.

In winter, both sexes wore fur-lined, full length robes, however, we know relatively little about their winter attire. The Jesuits mentioned mittens of fur, fur-lined moccasins insulated with dried grass and fur caps. I suspect that they wore several layers of fur-lined clothing with a blanket or robe pulled over the shoulders, but that is partially conjecture based upon incomplete data and a few early sketches.

Hair

Girls wore their hair long and loose. Women seem likewise, to have favoured long hair worn loose. If a 17th century Mohawk boy were to appear in modern attire on the street today, his hair would pass without notice, although people would think it a little shaggy, but not overly long.

When a boy was about 15, he began to pluck his hair except for a strip down the middle, which was greased to stick up. This is the famous "Mohawk" hairdo - a somewhat incorrect name, since most tribes of the eastern U.S. and southeastern Canada wore a similar style. An older boy or adult male wore his hair in a "Mohawk" until he was past the age for participation in warfare. Modern illustrations and museum exhibits portraying Iroquois warriors with long braided hair are simply inaccurate.

Men plucked their beard. For that matter, both sexes removed any hair on their bodies below the neck. It was apparently considered unattractive and animal-like.

Both sexes had their ears pierced in infancy or early childhood. Small beads of clay, copper, bone, etc. were used as ear ornaments. Other ornaments (necklaces, armbands etc.) seem primarily to have been worn for dress-up occasions. Paint likewise, was worn when someone wanted to dress up. We think of natives as wearing paint for war, which they did, but they also used it for parties, feasts or ceremonies.. Evidence of Iroquois use of feathers in the hair is limited, but they probably did wear them. Mohawk warriors were known in later periods to wear tattoos. There are few references to tattooing in early writings. More likely, tattooing came into style later but it is also possible the early Jesuits simply did not mention it.


 
 

Don't leave without searching for your ancestors on Olive Tree Genealogy! Free Ships' Passenger lists, orphan records, almshouse records, JJ Cooke Shipping Lists, Irish Famine immigrants, family surnames, church records, military muster rolls, census records, land records and more are free to help you find your brick-wall ancestor. Build your family tree quickly with Olive Tree Genealogy free records

URL: http://olivetreegenealogy.com/           All rights reserved          Copyright 1996-present
These pages may be freely linked to but not duplicated in any fashion without my written consent.

Home Philosophy Helping FAQ Link to Olive Tree Make Olive Tree Your Homepage Library Friends Search Store About Lorine Awards, Interviews About OliveTreeGenealogy


Contact Lorine at Contact Lorine of Olive Tree Genealogy