OliveTreeGenealogy.com logo for Olive Tree Genealogy and its free free genealogical resourcesYour link to the past since February 1996! Search for your ancestors in free Ships' Passenger lists, Naturalization Records, Palatine Genealogy, Canadian Genealogy, American Genealogy, Native American Genealogy, Huguenots, Mennonites, Almshouse Records, Orphan Records, church records, military muster rolls, census records, land records and more. Olive Tree Genealogy Free Genealogy Database marks FREE genealogy records.
Olive Tree Genealogy Blog was one of MyHeritage top 100 Genealogy blogs, one of the 25 Most Popular Genealogy Blogs by Technorati and one of the Top 40 Genealogy Blogs 2011 & 2012.

See the list of Ten People All Genealogists Should Follow On Twitter


FIRST NAME


LAST NAME


LOCALITY


Check out the Genealogy Books written by Olive Tree Genealogy!

The Van Slyke Family in America has been revised and is available. See all Family History books
 
 
 
Genealogy Spotlight
Genealogy Tips


Try an Ancestry.com Free Trial



Flip-Pal Mobile Scanners
Read my review of this amazing little scanner

Preserve memories with the Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner!
Spread the Word
Share with other genealogists! Tweet this page!

Google Plus Proilfe page for Olive Tree GenealogyFollow Olive Tree Genealogy on Google+

Genealogy Ideas
Your Name in History
Find out if your Surname is part of the Our Name in History Collection! Just type your surname into the search box
 
Get Started in Genealogy
Discover Your Ancestors on Fold3

Types of Early Photographs

Daguerreotypes (ca 1839)

Photography arrived in the United States in 1839 thanks to Samuel F. B. Morse, an American artist and inventor. Morse visited Daguerre in Paris in March 1839 and observed a demonstration of the daguerreotype process. He returned to the United States to spread the news, and by the end of 1839 some larger cities on the East Coast had very successful portrait studios.
daguerreotype 6th plate 1854 Franklin Amos Pratt 6th plate Daguerreotype taken ca 1854

Ambrotypes (circa 1854)

The ambrotype was a glass negative backed with black material, which enabled it to appear as a positive image. Patented in 1854, the ambrotype was made, packaged, and sold in portrait studios as the daguerreotype had been, but at a lower cost. The ambrotype produced a single image on glass.
9th plate Ambrotype ca 1858 9th plate Ambrotype ca 1858
1861 Ambrotype 6th plate Ambrotype 1861

Tintypes (circa 1855)

The Ferrotype process (tintypes) was introduced in the United States in 1855. It substituted an iron plate for glass and was even cheaper than the ambrotype. Because tintypes were placed in albums along with CDVs, they were often trimmed at the sides and corners. Tintypes were produced in various sizes
  • Full plate 6 1/2" x 8 1/2"
  • Half plate 4 1/2" x 51/2"
  • 1/4 plate 3 1/8" x 4 1/8"
  • 1/6 plate 2 1/2" x 3 1/2"
  • 1/9 plate 2" x 2 Ĺ"
  • Gem approximately 1/2" x 1"




Example of Gem tintype in Oval Matte ca 1860s photo-tintype 1.5x2.5 Civil War Soldier tintype 2.5x4
Gem tintype ca 1860s. A Gem tintype could be 3/4" to 1" wide. Carte de visite sized card mounts (2Ĺ"x4") enclosed the gem and the finished item was known as a carte de visite tintype or ferrotype 9th plate ( 2 x 2.5) tintype in matte. Civil War Soldier 6th plate (2.5 x 3.5) tintype.

Carte de Visite or CDVs (ca 1859)

CDV stands for carte de visite, a photographic calling card. The CDV process, which began in France in 1854, involved a special camera that produced eight poses on one negative. The CDV quickly replaced the old glass images of the ambrotypes, producing a card the size of the then standard calling card, around 2.5 by 4".

The CDVís albumen process produced a negative from which any number of prints could be made - and on early CDVs it was important for the photographer to note that more prints were always available.

CDVs arrived in the United States around 1859, on the eve of the Civil War (1861-1865) during which demand skyrocketed as soldiers and their loved ones sought an affordable image remembrance. Many people began collecting portraits of political figures, actors and actresses, Civil War generals, as well as family and friends. Special photo albums were designed especially for cartes-de-visite.

In the United States, the carte-de-visite played second fiddle to cheaper variations on the daguerreotype theme. Thus the early CDVs are rather uncommon.
CDV with square corners ca 1872 Example of CDV with rounded corners Civil War Era - Jemima Van Slyke
CDV with square corners pre 1872 CDV with rounded corners after 1872. Jemima Van Slyke CDV with corners cut to fit album. You must use fashion clues, revenue stamps or photographer logo or name to date the photograph

Cabinet Cards (circa 1870)

CDVís were eventually replaced in the 1870s by the larger Cabinet Cards which used the same photographic process but were on a larger 4 by 6" card.
cabinet card 1877 Cabinet Card 1882 Cabinet Card 1900
Cabinet Card 1877 Cabinet Card 1882 Cabinet Card ca 1900


View Ancestor Photo Albums | Identify Ancestor Photos: Types of Early Photographs | Hints for Dating Old Photographs | Dating Old Photographs through Clothing & Hairstyle | How Revenue Stamps Can Date Ancestor Photos

Genealogy Spotlight
NEW!
Free Genealogy Trials
*Trial Access Ancestry.com
*14 Days FREE Ancestry.co.uk

Genealogy Top Pick

Olive Tree Free Genealogy
Search for ancestors on the monthly list of free Olive Tree Genealogy databases
Lost Faces Ancestor Photos from the 1800s

Wishing you had an ancestor photograph? See the 1800s photographs and ancestor photo albums on Lost Faces. There are over 2,500 photos in this growing genealogy collection


Don't leave without searching for your ancestors on Olive Tree Genealogy! Free Ships' Passenger lists, orphan records, almshouse records, JJ Cooke Shipping Lists, Irish Famine immigrants, family surnames, church records, military muster rolls, census records, land records and more are free to help you find your brick-wall ancestor. Build your family tree quickly with Olive Tree Genealogy free records

URL: http://olivetreegenealogy.com/           All rights reserved          Copyright © 1996-present
These pages may be freely linked to but not duplicated in any fashion without my written consent.

Home Philosophy Helping FAQ Link to Olive Tree Make Olive Tree Your Homepage Library Friends Search Store About Lorine Awards, Interviews About OliveTreeGenealogy


Contact Lorine at Contact Lorine of Olive Tree Genealogy