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SHIPS PASSENGER LISTS TO CANADA

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Ship John Barry from Cork Ireland to Quebec

Journal of the Transport Ship John Barry between 22 April and 22 July 1825 during which time the said ship has been employed in conveying the Irish Emigrant Settlers from Cork to Quebec.

The journal has detailed notes on each of the Irish passengers Surgeon William Burnie treated. I have extracted the names, ages, dates of admission, whether the patient died or recovered and a few notes for some patients. Most patients have their illnesses noted in detail, along with medicines given, reaction of patient and other data.

It was quite distressing to read the surgeon's detailed accounts of their suffering, especially for the children. I have not included any such details in this extraction. It was very interesting reading the common medical treatments of the time, and also reading brief notes about conditions on board ship, food, accomodation etc.
  • May 20, 1825, vaccinated 18 children with the matter received from The Navy Board, including three children vaccinated by Surgeon Powers on the Elizabeth, it failed in every case. The vaccine must either have been too kept too long or originally bad. All the vaccinations on the John Barry failed.
  • July 10, 1825. Arrived Lachine. Met up with Surgeon Power's party [The Elizabeth] at the Barracks. More disease was contracted by contact with the ill in Power's boat.
  • July 19, 1825, Ay 11 am left Lachine and proceeded in Bateaux up the river [St. Lawrence]. The sick were put in a bateaux with an awning, the rest were in open boats. At 5 pm a violent thunderstorm and all passengers drenched and wet, also their bedding so all uncamped at the Cascades. One child died at 8 am July 20th from the weather
Surname; First Name; Age; Admission Date; Discharged or Died; Surgeon's Notes

Undated Note. Two of the women, Margaret Groves, aged 46, Widow, and Margaret Baragy, aged 29, married, were sea sick whenever the ship had the least motion the whole voyage, from embarking until arrival in the St Lawrence river.

Margaret Condon, aged 38, married; Put on sick list, 3 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 16 June 1825.

John Duhill, aged 14; Put on sick list, 9 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 24 June 1825.

Thomas Duhill aged 12; Put on sick list, 10 July 1825, Lachine. Died 19 July 1825. On the road from Montreal to Lachine he drank "great quantity of water milk" and developed bowel problems. His mother gave him ale against surgeon's wishes, when the boy begged for it. His condition worsened. Parents would not allow the "blister" to be applied saying the boy would not live until morning. On the 18th of July parents agreed to do whatever surgeon ordered. He was transferred to the surgeon at Prescott.

Thomas Foley, aged 18; Put on sick list, 18 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 4 July 1825.

Margaret Groves aged 13; Put on sick list, 25 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 20 July 1825.

John Kealehan, 28, put on sick list 8 July when emigrants left the ship. Discharged cured 24 July 1825

Helen Kealehan, 28, married. Put on sick list 16 July 1825. Discharged cured 29 July 1825. Was nursing her husband when fell ill herself. She miscarried at 9 p.m. in her 4th month of pregnancy after the violent thunderstorm in open bateaux

Dennis Kealehan, 18 Put on sick list 17 July 1825. Discharged cured 30 July 1825

Timothy Leary, aged 50; Put on sick list, 17 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 24 June 1825.

Mary Leary, aged 18; Put on sick list, 17 May 1825, at Cove of Cork. Discharged cured, 24 May 1825.

Cornelius McAuliffe, aged 32; Put on sick list, 17 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 23 June 1825.

James Mahony, aged 13; Put on sick list, 8 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 30 June 1825 .

Julia Mahoney, aged 10; Put on sick list, 19 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 5 July 1825.

Nancy Mahoney, aged 7; Put on sick list, 21 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 5 July 1825.

Andrew Malony, aged 9; Put on sick list, 17 May 1825, at Cove of Cork. Discharged cured, 28 May 1825.

Margaret Malony, aged 5 months; Delicate child. Put on sick list, 14 June 1825, at sea. Died, 20 July 1825, after leaving Lachine in batteaux. Slow recovery until arrival at Montreal, 29 June 1825, when the mother stopped bathing her and she again became unwell. Died at 8 am after being drenched in violent thunderstorm the day before.

Elizabeth Mulcahy, aged 8; Put on sick list, 12 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 26 June 1825.

Bridget O'Brien, aged 1; weakly child. Put on sick list 22 June 1825 at sea, died 3 July 1825, buried on shore. Surgeon's note "The ship being on shore has caused such an uproar among the people that its [the child] parents neglect it and wish it to death"

David Owens, 8, put on sick list 10 July at Lachine. Discharged cured 18th July 1825

Timothy Regan, aged 35; . Put on sick list, 2 June 1825 at sea. His family had been in moderate circumstances but now starving and appear "Broken by distress". Sent to the emigrant hospital at Quebec 7 July 1825 where he died a day or two later.

Mary Regan, aged 10; Put on sick list, 14 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 24 June 1825.

Norah Regan, aged 13; Put on sick list, 19 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 26 June 1825.

Catherine Regan, aged 32, married; in her 8th month of pregnancy. Put on sick list, 17 June 1825, at sea. Died, 19 July 1825. She refused to leave her husband Timothy Regan during his illness. On the 21st she consented to leave and she and children were put in an aft cabin with 2 sleeping berths. On the 22nd June she went into labour and at 6 am. a female child was born. Sent with her family to the emigrant hospital at Quebec on 7 July. She and her children joined the emigrants at Lachine on 16 July 1825, her husband having died in the hospital. Her children report that she has had nothing to eat but bread from time to time since they left Quebec and arrived at Lachine. At Lachine she ate a good supper and breakfast the next day but became ill again and suffered from vomiting from the 18 July 1825 until her death.

Michael Regan aged 6; Put on sick list, 21 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 28 June 1825.

Mary Shea aged 12; Put on sick list, 29 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 10 July 1825.

Dennis Shea, aged 18 months; Put on sick list, 20 June 1825, at sea. Died 28 June 1825. Mother would not remove child's dirty clothing even when Surgeon gave her clean linens. Surgeon changed the child himself but that night mother put the dirty clothing back on. Mother also refused to give the child the medications Surgeon mixed, and took "the blister" [may be something like a mustard pack?] off the child. After child's death, the mother expressed anger that the "blister" was ever applied in the first place

Mary Slattery, aged 24, married, 3 children; Put on sick list, 2 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 12 June 1825. On June 5 she was given oatmeal to make gruel for herself and her family. Surgeon states "... her husband was so useless and indolent he did not prepare it"

James Slatttery aged 26; Put on sick list, 22 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 10 July 1825. Fractured clavicle when ship rolled in the afternoon

John Slattery, 1, put on sick list 10 July at Lachine. Died midnight 15 July 1825.

Judith Slattery, aged 3; Put on sick list, 20 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 6 July 1825.

Catherine Sullivan, aged 12; Put on sick list, 28 May 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 28 June 1825.

Ellen Sullivan, aged 38, married; went into labour at 11 p.m. in 3rd month of pregnancy. Miscarried. Put on sick list, 8 June 1825, at sea. Discharged cured, 13 June 1825. Thought to be from the fatigue of nursing her daughter Catherine Sullivan.

Hannah Twomey aged 8; Put on sick list, 4 July 1825, St. Lawrence River. Discharged cured 10 July 1825 at Lachine

Surgeon's Notes: There were 5 deaths on the voyage. Several of the women and children and some of the men have feverish symptoms from change of diet and situation, constipation and sea sickness. In two or three days they are cured by purgatives. Weather during the entire voyage was bad. 200 miles below Quebec the ship ran aground in thick fog and remained stuck for 18 hours. Many passengers became unruly and endangered the ship, but other passengers were instrumental in helping to save the ship, the stores and some lives

Please see Sue Swiggum's Peter Robinson Settlers Ship John Barry from Cork to Canada 1825 for a list of passengers compiled from 2 National Archives of Canada microfilm.

Source: ADM 101/77/8 pdf file from National Archives UK

Search Irish Records Searchable databases include
Irish Flax Growers List, 1796
Irish Records Index, 1500-1920
Census Records for Ireland
Scots-Irish
Scots-Irish in Virginia Vol. 1, Vol.2 , Vol.3
Irish Quakers Immigration into Pennsylvania
New England Irish Pioneers
Chicago Irish Families, 1875-1925

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